Posts Tagged ‘Strategy’

Digitale Insight Tools für Kampagnen- und Strategie-Entwicklung

Julian Cole hat eine ganze Reihe von Tools zusammengestellt, anhand derer man im digitalen Umfeld Statistiken finden kann, um Insights für z.B. Kampagnen oder Statistiken zu finden.

Gibt noch eine Reihe mehr Tool, aber einige der Wichtigsten sind dabei:

 

 

 

How to choose the right Social Media approach.

2010 will be the year, in which (at least in Germany) companies will try to strategically integrate Social Media into their marketing mix. As opposed to previous years, when Social Media (often phrased as “viral” campaign elements) was already part of the briefing due to the glitter and glamour, but nobody could actually pinpoint the relevance and contribution of the tactics.

Jeremiah Owyang is now providing some guidance for the first and essential question for companies trying to look at the subject wholistically: is it a brand play, is it a product play, shall we enter with a lifestyle approach or separate activities by location?

His approach is a Matrix: How To Choose Social Media Programs by Brand, Lifestyle, Product or Location to avoid the following pitfalls:

Companies that choose poorly will have wasted internal efforts and resources, set up false expectations for customers and may struggle with trying to redact a program in public where customers are already assembling. [...] having no strategy means that product teams, regional teams, and individual regions will do whatever they want –causing clean up for corporate late.

As a first orientation I think this will serve companies quite well. Surely, each quadrant can be made more specific to each companies situation and needs, but that should be left for the individual Social Media consultant…

At the end there is short guidance on how to choose the right mix:

  1. First, be customer focused.
  2. For best results, use in combinations
  3. Think long term –not just by campaign.

Linktip: 10 Social Media Myths

This is a great list of the 10 Social Media Myths. Quite a few I have heard myself, too:

1. Great Content Always Goes Hot
2. There are No Rules
3. You Can’t Build Quality Relationships Online
4. The More Friends, the Better
5. Social Media Marketing is Easy
6. Social Media Won’t Last
7. Social Media will Replace Traditional Marketing
8. Social Media is a Cure-All
9. Social Media is for Kids
10. Digg is All that Matters

Go to the site and read it, it’s great stuff!

Wishlist for the agency of the future

Just a quick pointer: Sapient sponsored a survey in the US asking marketers, what they want from their agencies in the future. Here is the top 10 list of things:

  1. A greater knowledge of digital space
  2. More use of “pull interactions”
  3. Leverage virtual communities
  4. Agency executives using the technology they are recommending
  5. Chief Digital Officers make agencies more appealing
  6. Web 2.0 and social media savvy
  7. Agencies that understand consumer behavior
  8. Demonstrate strategic thinking
  9. Branding and creative capabilities
  10. Ability to measure success

There is some more detail to these points at the sapient website.

Google and Apple and the no compromise for bucks philosophy.

Just the other day I posted this graphic at my german blog:

applegoogle.jpg

The graphic is from this place here. Just today I found the ‘corresponding article’ about ‘how google and apple dominate‘ whatever field they are moving into. Written by Umair Haque, this article goes into the “no compromise for bucks” philosophy that is at the core of their DNA – Goople’s DNA, as he calls the two companies:

The ends they’re working towards are similar: Goople aspires to – with laserlike intensity – change the world for the better. And where most of their competitors will sell out everything they believe in for a few bucks and a latte, Goople is deeply, radically purposive: they won’t compromise much, if anything, to achieve the goal of changing the world for the better.

Go read that and remember the graphic above. And then keep this in mind whenever you’re thinking of a company’s strategy.

Viral Marketing – Is it about people, ideas or context?

Is the tipping point toast? This is the title of a rather interesting article on fastcompany magazine.

There is a lot of thinking and research going on in order to find out, what will trigger a viral (marketing) explosion of any sort. Is it the people, the context or the actual idea? Or would it be a mixture of all? Most people will have read Malcolm Gladwells “Tipping Point” or similar literature. In his book, all three are important, yet most marketers have started to focus too narrowly on the people part of the equation.

Now Gareth points me to an article to that article on fast company magazine. And it seems from this work that the ‘who’ is not really what matters; instead it’s the context and, most importantly, the idea itself that matters the most when it comes to the spread of new things. Like in a forrest fire, where nobody would expect the person causing it to be highly influential or the match extremely flammable. Instead it is crystal clear that the forrest was ready for it…

“If society is ready to embrace a trend, almost anyone can start one–and if it isn’t, then almost no one can,” Watts concludes. To succeed with a new product, it’s less a matter of finding the perfect hipster to infect and more a matter of gauging the public’s mood. Sure, there’ll always be a first mover in a trend. But since she generally stumbles into that role by chance, she is, in Watts’s terminology, an “accidental Influential.”

Perhaps the problem with viral marketing is that the disease metaphor is misleading. Watts thinks trends are more like forest fires: There are thousands a year, but only a few become roaring monsters. That’s because in those rare situations, the landscape was ripe: sparse rain, dry woods, badly equipped fire departments. If these conditions exist, any old match will do. “And nobody,” Watts says wryly, “will go around talking about the exceptional properties of the spark that started the fire.”

Duncan Watts, the originator of this not really new, yet still untrendy thought (I guess the context still isn’t right), calculated this with computer models:

That may be oversimplifying it a bit, but last year, Watts decided to put the whole idea to the test by building another Sims-like computer simulation. He programmed a group of 10,000 people, all governed by a few simple interpersonal rules. Each was able to communicate with anyone nearby. With every contact, each had a small probability of “infecting” another. And each person also paid attention to what was happening around him: If lots of other people were adopting a trend, he would be more likely to join, and vice versa. The “people” in the virtual society had varying amounts of sociability–some were more connected than others. Watts designated the top 10% most-connected as Influentials; they could affect four times as many people as the average Joe. In essence, it was a virtual society

So, a computer model, a rather static even, I would assume, is behind this? Not sure if I want to really believe in the validity of this approach. But hey, I am a marketer – and it says in the article that us marketers are amongst the heaviest doubters of this research.

Mind you, Watts does agree that some people are more instrumental than others. He simply doesn’t think it’s possible to will a trend into existence by recruiting highly social people. The network effects in society, he argues, are too complex–too weird and unpredictable–to work that way. If it were just a matter of tipping the crucial first adopters, why can’t most companies do it reliably?

True, damn it, very true. I wish there would be a reliable mechanism, of course I do. We do try to design built viral campaigns along the learnings of past campaigns, because that is the only thing we have.

As Watts points out, viral thinkers analyze trends after they’ve broken out. “They start with an existing trend, like Hush Puppies, and they go backward until they’ve identified the people who did it first, and then they go, ‘Okay, these are the Influentials!’” But who’s to say those aren’t just Watts’s accidental Influentials, random smokers who walked, unwittingly, into a dry forest? East Village hipsters were wearing lots of cool things in the fall of 1994. But, as Watts wondered, why did only Hush Puppies take off? Why didn’t their other clothing choices reach a tipping point too?

What you can do, and that is part of the conclusion of that article, is to offer a mechanism to spread your ideas to every single person who might actually be able to send it on to at least one other person. Doesn’t sound like a great strategy, but if your goal is maximum spread, why focus only on so called influencers – i.e. focus too narrow. Spread to everyone, as far and wide as your own resources allow you to. Start with the people you consider influencers, granted – you have to start somewhere, but once you’re done with those, include everyone else, too.

A complete list of web marketing areas

I am impressed with this extensive list of web marketing areas by Jeremiah Owyang. It’s, as he calls it “A Complete List of the Many Forms of Web Marketing for 2008″ and for the moment it does indeed look very complete.

This document catalogs the many tools and tactics available for corporate web strategy in 2008. Even if your strategy or resource limitations restrict you from entering all spaces, awareness of the changes in our digital landscape are critical. This document is intended for decision makers roles such as CMO/VP/Director of Web and Marketing.

If anything, it shows that digital marketing has become a considerably large field of opportunities! At the same time it shows that there is still huge potential and opportunities for most companies out there.

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