Archive for February 2006

cool 3D “Aparición” – take your time, though

The Hidden Persuader shows a cool ad: first it looks like a pile of black and white stripes. But then you look at it for a while, your eyes get a little tired, and then…

Check it out. I guess this sort of thing works even better in print vs on screen.

Stay away from technology, if you want to be productive

According to Wired News, we’re less productive using tech:
“We think we’re faster, smarter, better with all this technology at our side and in the end, we still feel rushed and our feeling of productivity is down,” said Maria Woytek, marketing communications manager for Day-Timers, a unit of ACCO Brands.

Only 51% of Workers now still claim that they feel very productive – 1994 that was up at 83%.

I haven’t been working in 1994, on the contrary, I was a student and just getting used to computers. But what they say in that article sounds realistic…

I am going to switch of this computer right now.

(not)

Paying for Podcasts?

As I just found out, the Ricky Gervais show on podcast now charges money for their podcast. Up to $1.95 per episode. That will be a nice little revenue stream for them, as some of the episodes have been downloaded more than 250.000 times (even though this number is now most likely to decrease a lot).

I don’t think I will pay in order to continue to listen. There are so many other podcasts – may be not as good, but at least for free. We’ll see.

This will be the start of a whole new debate: how much can you charge for a podcast? How much for a show done by professionals, but sounding rather improvised – like amateurs podcasts (which is how I perceive the Ricky Gervais podcasts)?

And, from a users perspective: how good does a podcast have to be, in order for you to willingly dish out $2 per 30 minutes?

I have no answers, as I only now thought about these questions myself… May be later.

Guinness is blogging and Germany may not read it

A few marketing people at Guiness have started blogging!

As Werbeblogger writes, these are the Marketing Director, Marketing Manager, two Senior Brand Managern and the Sponsorchip Manager.

But do make sure you pretend you’re from somewhere in the UK. Here is why:

Next, lots of people from countries outside of the UK are asking why they can’t access the blog. There are two answers to this. Obviously Guinness is one great brand that’s widely loved in about 150 countries. But the drinkers in those countries are all different so what the various marketing teams get up to differs also. What’s on this blog is specifically about our GB plans – hence the focus on those drinkers. There are legal issues with us making content the GB team have written available to other countries.

If you claim you’re from “other”, you’re being sent straight on to Yahoo! (which isn’t all that bad either).

What I find particularly interesting: the marketing people are blogging about their jobs, even posting agency storyboards of TV spots.

Sponsored Link Impressions Up 16 Percent

Sponsored link impressions are up 16 percent writes Clickz.

At the moment, Online Advertising is projected to grow at 19%, but search engine advertising is supposed to grow at 26% according to the same source.

This shows, how important search advertising is growing to be. It is important enough, obviously, for some companies to seriously think about how to incentivise the user for using their search engines. MSN even put up a microsite with a sweepstake for using their search, called search and win.
Or even pay Dell $10 for every computer shipped that has their desktop search function pre-installed, as this German website says.

The search war ain’t over yet. Expect more, evermore interesting battles, of which, hopefully, mainly the user will benefit.

Better than Google Earth or Maps?

Google Earth is a brilliant tool, no doubt. And the only one I have seen even web-agnostics use. Clearly, Google wants to sell location-relevant advertising. But it doesn’t do that in Germany, yet. So another company came along – one that originates from the yellow pages industry:
GoYellow.de now created a map of Germany that includes satellite images, which are at least as good quality as at Google. And, most importantly, GoYellow put all their yellow pages entries on the map, including a function to contact the location. You enter your phone number, and GoYellow will call you back to connect you with that retailer, restaurant or whatever it is you were searching for.

Another add-on: you can enter where you currently are, and German Rail will tell you how you can get from your location to the location your were searching for.

This is great stuff, whenever I find tools like these on the net, I am more than ever convinced, that in a few years there will be only little added-value left that traditional media can provide compared to these kind of things. Something like being “accessible” even during a power-outage (when all batteries happen to be flat at the same time), for example.

It doesn’t happen often, that web-related news from Germany make it abroad (except for the recent and utterly stupid “Klowand” debate, mabye). But this one apparently even fascinated Jeff Jarvis of BuzzMachine

Volvo lets you see the Internet in 3D!

Whhoow, how cool is that?
AdLand pointed me to a campaign Volvo did for prospects around the world.

They sent out 3D glasses (the ones with a red and a green lens) with a URL printed on them leading to a microsite, where you can watch a story in 3D. The first internet site in 3D, as they claim – and which I can’t verify just now…

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